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Copyright © 2001-2011

[K. L. Dugery, and EbonDragon  Productions]

All rights reserved. Revised: September 14, 2011

 

None of the  material here may be reproduced in any format without express permission of K.L. Dugery, the Clan of the Dragon, and EbonDragon Productions.

 

 

 

The Myth of "Elemental Dragons"

By J'Karrah, 2005

 I always have to laugh when I hear people talking about "elemental" Dragons as if they were actual species variants. And it makes me wonder if the people who spout this information have ever actually *met* a Dragon. Personally, I doubt it. There simply is no such thing as an "elemental" Dragon. People have too often confused the magical affiliation of specific Dragons with the habitat in which they live. For example, there is a big difference between a Dragon who works with the elemental properties of water, and a Dragon who makes his or her home near the sea.


    The game "Dungeons and Dragons," and the book "Dancing With Dragons" are the primary perpetrators of this continued proliferation of misinformation.


    As with human magic workers, different Dragons can have an affinity for different elemental energies. Just as you don’t have “elemental humans” you don’t have “elemental Dragons…” you simply have those who prefer to work with the energies of one element over another. Sometimes, you will find a Dragon who works equally well with all elemental energies and other times you'll find one who couldn’t tell a salamander from an undine.


    Whenever you hear someone talking about “elemental Dragons,” those that embody the forces of a particular Element, most likely they are either confusing the mage with the magic, or they are seeing an elemental critter in draconic form... 9 times out of 10 by simple virtue of their own preconceived notions.... Or they are confusing alchemical associations of draconic energies with actual Dragons.


    The common metaphysical representations of each element are: Fire- the Salamander; Water- the Undine; Air- the Zephyer; Earth- the Gnome.


    In my magical dealing with Dragons over the course of the past 20 years, I have worked with a wide variety of them and have established close working relationships with several. In ritual, when calling the "Dragons of the Quarters," you are asking for a willing Dragon who is proficient with the energies of a particular element to watch over and direct the elemental energies associated with that particular quarter/direction. You are not calling on, for example a "fire Dragon" to guard the south, you are calling on the assistance of a Dragon who works primarily with the energies associated with the element of Fire. See the difference?


    If you are new to working magically with Dragons, at first you will probably get several different Dragons standing in as Quarter Guards each time you cast a circle. Eventually, you may find that the same four are answering your call each time (you'll be able to tell by the "feel" of the energy each brings). If/when this happens, you can either wait until the Dragon chooses to reveal his or her name, or you can choose a name by which you will call each one (don't worry, if you pick a name the Dragon doesn't like, you'll know!). Many Dragons actually prefer to work this latter way, taking the name you choose for them as a gift. In either case, you can then substitute those names for the phrases "One who is willing" and "Great ______ Dragon" at the appropriate quarter.

    To get the greatest benefit when working with Dragons you must always remember to set aside any preconceived notions you might have about Dragons and their ways of working magic. Dragons cannot be easily pigeon-holed into neat little compartments. They are as individual as humans are, and their talents, associations, abilities, and methods are as varied and diverse as the stars above.

    Work with them in all their diversity rather than try to force them into narrowly defined patterns of behavior and you will have a much richer, more rewarding experience than you could ever have imagined.